Why partition?
Simple question, eh? Most people have a vague knowledge of what partitions are, since every operating system has the ability to create or remove them. It may seem strange that Linux uses more than one partition on the same disk, even when using the standard installation procedure, so some explanation is called for.

Surely there is no different if you use a whole disk dedicated for one application, such as database, etc.. However, if you you have different directories for different purpose, such OS disk. It's better to partition it before install OS on it.

Here is why partition

One of the goals of having different partitions is to achieve higher data security in case of disaster. By dividing the hard disk in partitions, data can be grouped and separated. When an accident occurs, only the data in the partition that got the hit will be damaged, while the data on the other partitions will most likely survive.

This principle dates from the days when Linux didn't have journaled file systems and power failures might have lead to disaster. The use of partitions remains for security and robustness reasons, so a breach on one part of the system doesn't automatically mean that the whole computer is in danger. This is currently the most important reason for partitioning. A simple example: a user creates a script, a program or a web application that starts filling up the disk. If the disk contains only one big partition, the entire system will stop functioning if the disk is full. If the user stores the data on a separate partition, then only that (data) partition will be affected, while the system partitions and possible other data partitions keep functioning.

Mind that having a journaled file system only provides data security in case of power failure and sudden disconnection of storage devices. This does not protect your data against bad blocks and logical errors in the file system. In those cases, you should use a RAID (Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks) solution.


Partition layout and types

There are two kinds of major partitions on a Linux system:

    data partition: 
normal Linux system data, including the root partition containing all the data to start up and run the system.

    swap partition:
expansion of the computer's physical memory, extra memory on hard disk.

Most systems contain a root partition, one or more data partitions and one or more swap partitions. Systems in mixed environments may contain partitions for other system data, such as a partition with a FAT or VFAT file system for MS Windows data.

Most Linux systems use fdisk or parted at installation time to set the partition type. This usually happens automatically. On some occasions, you will need to select the partition type manually and even manually do the actual partitioning. The standard Linux partitions have number 82 for swap and 83 for data, which can be journaled (ext3,ext4) or normal (ext2, on older systems). The fdisk or parted utility has built-in help, should you forget these values.

Apart from these two, Linux supports a variety of other file system types, such as the relatively new Reiser file system, JFS, NFS, FATxx and many other file systems natively available on other (proprietary) operating systems.

The standard root partition (indicated with a single forward slash, /) contains the system configuration files, most basic commands and server programs, system libraries, some temporary space and the home directory of the administrative user.

Swap space (indicated with swap) is only accessible for the system itself, and is hidden from view during normal operation. Swap is the system that ensures, like on normal UNIX systems, that you can keep on working, whatever happens. On Linux, you will virtually never see irritating messages like Out of memory, please close some applications first and try again, because of this extra memory. The swap or virtual memory procedure has long been adopted by operating systems outside the UNIX world by now.

Using memory on a hard disk is naturally slower than using the real memory chips of a computer, but having this little extra is a great comfort.

Linux generally counts on having twice the amount of physical memory in the form of swap space on the hard disk.

In most of cases, you will find that you also have a /boot partition, holding your kernel(s) and accompanying data files.

The rest of the hard disk(s) is generally divided in data partitions, although it may be that all of the non-system critical data resides on one partition, for example when you perform a standard workstation installation. When non-critical data is separated on different partitions, it usually happens following a set pattern:

    a partition for user programs (/usr)

    a partition containing the users' personal data (/home)

    a partition to store temporary data like print- and mail-queues (/var)

    a partition for third party and extra software (/opt)

The division of hard disks into partitions is determined by the system administrator. On larger systems, he or she may even spread one partition over several hard disks, using the appropriate software. Most distributions allow for standard setups optimized for workstations (average users) and for general server purposes, but also accept customized partitions.